Cumberland Times-News

Editorials

November 7, 2012

Gridlock

Election leaves worst problem unresolved

Now that the nation’s voters have returned President Barack Obama to office for another four years, the real challenge for the government lies ahead — how to end the partisan gridlock that has paralyzed Washington for too many years.

Tuesday’s election changed little. The president was re-elected, Democrats retained control of the Senate, and Republicans are still the majority in the House of Representatives. All of that is a recipe for more in-fighting.

But the gridlock is especially worrisome at this juncture. Tax cuts enacted under President George W. Bush expire on Dec. 31, meaning higher tax rates for all Americans. On Jan. 2, $109 billion in across-the-board spending cuts will take effect unless Congress acts. If the higher tax rates and spending cuts are put into place, economists believe a “fiscal cliff” would drain about $600 billion out of the U.S. economy in 2013.

For his part, Obama is talking up unity and cooperation. Part of the Democrat agenda is cutting budget deficits by asking wealthy Americans to pay higher taxes, while extending lower rates for the middle class.

Republicans will likely have none of that. House Speaker John Boehner said Tuesday: “For two years, our House majority has been the primary line of defense for the American people against a government that spends too much, taxes too much, certainly borrows too much, when it’s left unchecked. With this vote the American people have also made clear that there’s no mandate for raising tax rates.”

Poll after poll shows the American voter is fed up with partisan fighting and gridlock. It’s a lesson few in Washington have learned. Unfortunately, many of those slow-learners were returned to office on Tuesday.

1
Text Only
Editorials
  • Get involved Get involved

    Cumberland residents who want to make an impact on their community have an opportunity in that the city is seeking applicants for five of its boards.

    July 30, 2014 1 Photo

  • If we don’t sell it to them, somebody else will

    The front page article on coal exports by AP writer Dina Cappiello is one of the most asinine and biased “news” articles I’ve read (“Not in my backyard: U.S. sending dirty coal abroad,” July 29 Times-News, Page 1A).

    July 30, 2014

  • Not a villain Not a villain

    Time was that we looked for heroes. Heroes of the make-believe variety have sold a lot of comic books. We also had real-life heroes like Presidents Franklin D. Roosevelt and John F. Kennedy, whose deaths the whole nation mourned.
    These days, we seem to be more interested in looking for villains. “Vote for me because I’m the good guy” has taken a back seat to “Don’t vote for him, because he’s the bad guy.”

    July 29, 2014 1 Photo

  • About time About time

    Although many Cumberland streets are in need of repair and improvements, the decision by city and county officials to address Greene Street is a good one.

    July 28, 2014 1 Photo

  • Where is it?

    Once upon a time, the Maryland Chamber of Commerce held its annual conventions at the Bedford Springs resort hotel near Bedford, which is in Pennsylvania.

    July 28, 2014

  • Korean War Korean War

    July 27, 2014 1 Photo

  • Sloppy lawmaking is to blame

    July 27, 2014

  • C-minus grade C-minus grade

    If a survey conducted by Thumbtack.com and the Kaufman Foundation is an accurate portrayal, Maryland has a long way to go to become a business-friendly state.

    July 24, 2014 1 Photo

  • Big loophole Big loophole

    How ironic — and how sad — that the Potomac Highlands Airport Authority plans a closed executive session to discuss the open meetings law.

    July 23, 2014 1 Photo 1 Story

  • Preposterous Preposterous

    File this one under the We Thought We’d Heard Everything category: A man who attempted the armed robbery of a pizza shop is now suing the pizzeria and the employees who tackled him and wrestled his gun away during the holdup.

    July 22, 2014 1 Photo