Cumberland Times-News

Editorials

March 24, 2013

Just another politician filled with contradictions

It would seem that some of our politicians

may suffer from a case of cognitive dissonance.

In a recent

Times-News article

U.S. Sen. Ben.

Cardin touted

what he considers

as positives for the area, such as the North-

South highway (“Senator optimistic on

region’s future,” Jan. 26, Page 1A). That’s been

in the works for decades and nothing much

has happened.

Cardin plugged the Appalachian Regional

Commission. The ARC is almost 50 years old.

We’re better off now than 50 years ago, right?

He mentioned the “possible” energy corridor

for our area; but not if his party has their

way on fracking. How can he be so duplicitous?

Cardin’s also high on tourism. ‘Nuff said.

How about other cognitively dissonant policies

pushed by Cardin and his compatriots?

How do politicians seek to make firearms

illegal which have been legal for many years,

yet intentionally increase the carnage on our

highways by forcing Detroit to build smaller,

lighter, and more dangerous vehicles?

The Heartland Institute estimates an additional

1,300 to 2,600 people have died every

year since 1975 due to government mileage

standards.

That is about 70,000 additional Americans

sacrificed at the altar of energy efficiency,

which is more than perished in Vietnam, Iraq,

and Afghanistan combined.

Did Cardin drive to mountain Maryland in a

Mini-Cooper?

These deadly gas mileage rules are intended

to reduce our dependence on foreign oil.

Yet Cardin’s party wants to stop positive

efforts for energy independence such as the

Keystone pipeline and to severely limit or stop

fracking in our own country.

No one will argue against the safest, most

cost-effective gas and oil exploration and

extraction, but is it rational to seek a complete

ban, or study the issue to death, which is the

obstructionists’ strategy du jour?

Instead, let’s keep killing a couple of thousand

people a year who have to drive kiddiecars?

Logic hurts, doesn’t it?

Then there’s life.

Somehow it’s OK to snuff out 3,000 innocent

lives each day (yes, each day) without due

process, but our Maryland Democrats seek to

preserve the lives of those who deserve society’s

most severe consequences for their

heinous actions.

Has the world gone mad? Any death penalty

case should be proven using the most stringent

standards, but consider the unintended

consequences of abolishing the death penalty.

In the past several years we’ve seen a number

of murders at our local prisons. The press

then dutifully reports that the perpetrator,

who is already serving a life sentence, will

serve an additional 20 years. How? Embalm

him when he dies and prop him up in a corner

for 20 years? It’s laughable if it weren’t so serious.

Suppose you’re already serving a life sentence

and you really don’t like a particular

prison guard?

We’ve already had many attacks on guards

here. Or you put a hit out on the district attorney

and police officers who put you away for

life. Worse yet, their families are targeted for

revenge.

What’s the worst that can happen to you if

you’re already a lifer?

And suppose you are such a loser that the

next serious crime you commit will result in a

life sentence. If it is a crime against another

person, will you let that person live to possibly

help put you away, or cover your tracks and

eliminate witnesses when the penalty is the

same?

Innocents die while the guilty go on. It boggles

the mind.

How do some politicians hold so many conflicting

or contradictory views in their minds

at the same time? It would drive most of us

mad. Maybe they’re already there.

Patrick Brady

Cumberland

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