Cumberland Times-News

Editorials

September 17, 2013

Army has never referred to these weapons as assault rifles

After reading the article pertaining to assault rifles being obtained by the Keyser police, I became very angry (“Keyser Police receive free M-16 rifles through military surplus program,” Sept. 10 Times-News, Page 1A).

I am a United States Army retiree. The Army does not, and never has thought of, or ever called an M16, an assault rifle.

First and foremost, it is a soldier’s defensive weapon, only to be used as an offensive weapon when the time comes that all other options have been exhausted.

The Army is under the command of the Department of Defense, not the Department of Offense, and surely not the Department of Assault.

Each time someone refers to a soldier’s primary weapon as an assault weapon, they are demoralizing the very proud and patriotic people that wear the uniform of the United States Armed Forces.

As soldiers, all of us swore to defend this great country,  not assault it.

If the Keyser police Department wants to obtain a number of assault weapons, then the public had better beware.

The prefix before the word weapons describes what the intent of the user is. It’s time people realize that the AR, in the name AR15, means Automatic Rifle. The M in M16 means Military.

According to many sources, there were more people killed with claw hammers last year than were killed by AR15s. Where’s the outcry for legislation?

I always hear the statement that nobody needs an AR15 or a 30-round magazine for personal defense or to use for sporting game or targets.

My answer to this is a question: Does anyone really need a TV, cell phone, car, boat, automobile, home or electricity? The list can go on and on.

Let’s all refer to an M16, or an AR15, for what it is: “A defenders choice of a defensive weapon.”

If you don’t think I’m correct, ask a vet!

Fred Paugh

Fountain, W.Va.

 

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