Cumberland Times-News

Editorials

May 19, 2013

Strength of gun laws is not reflected in grisly statistics

According to the FBI’s uniform crime reports, California had the highest number of gun murders in 2011 with 1,220, which makes up 68 percent of all murders in the state that year and equates to 3.25 murders per 100,000 people.

For the fifth year in a row, the Brady Campaign has issued a 100-point scorecard ranking all 50 states on the basis of laws that can reduce gun violence, such as background checks on all gun sales, permit-to-purchase requirements and limiting handgun purchases to one a month.

The irony of such a grisly statistic is that California was named the state with the strongest gun control laws in 2011 by the Brady Campaign to Prevent Gun Violence.

Brady considers the state ideal. It had a score of 81. Amazingly, the Brady Bunch is wrong. The state is No. 1.

Other states of interests are:

Maryland scored 45, seventh strictest (even before the new gun laws). Connecticut scored 51, fifth strictest (home of Newtown and Sandy Hook). New York scored 61, fourth strictest; Massachusetts scored 65, third best (didn’t stop the Boston bombings). New Jersey scored 72, second strictest .

Maryland will probably outscore California on the Brady Bunch Benchmark next year. Let’s hope it doesn’t mirror California’s gun murders. Maryland was already the seventh most restrictive state in the nation with a total of 31 murders by rifles in seven years. None of them could have been linked to “assault rifles.”

What tax is next to be gained, what freedom will be lost? Kris Kristofferson was singing about Malleyland when he said “Freedom is just another word for nothing left to lose”

What will be next for Malleyland?

Earl Charnagey

Cumberland

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