Cumberland Times-News

Editorials

June 17, 2014

Why the fuss?

Hampshire teacher dress code sounds reasonable

— Maybe we are missing something, but why is the dress code adopted by the Hampshire County Board of Education being made into a big deal by a teachers’ union?

The board has banned the following as unacceptable attire:

Torn clothing, shorts, blue jeans, hat and head wraps, leggings, immodest dress (too short, too tight, too low cut), T-shirt other than school affiliated, spandex, tank tops, see-through clothing, spaghetti straps or strapless and halters, clothing that exposes midriff, exercise sweatsuits-windsuits, beach-style flip-flops, yoga pants and drop crotch pants.

Shorts or sweatsuits are permitted for physical education or field trips; blue jeans only for job-related and/or outside projects for shop, AG, art or science labs.

That sounds like a reasonable dress code to us. Why would a teacher want to wear any of those items while in the classroom or with students?

Regardless, the American Federation of Teachers — West Virginia has asked that the dress code adopted May 19 be rescinded. Teachers are objecting, in part, because they said they had no chance to comment on the policy before it was approved by the school board.

The federation’s attorney sent a June 9 letter to Marianna Leone, superintendent of Hampshire County Schools, requesting the dress code to be withdrawn. Leone had nothing to say in a Monday interview other than the board has talked about the dress code all year and the board is the policymaker.

Arguing for the rescinding, Rob Wolford, an eighth-grade teacher at Romney Middle School, told the Times-News: “It is disheartening to see the Hampshire County Board of Education spend their time and effort on the issue of a dress code when issues such as a levy, deteriorating facilities, poor academic performance, inclusion of noncounty students into our performance ratings, and so forth, face us daily.” He also said if an individual teacher dresses in an inappropriate manner that affects the education of students, then the matter should be addressed directly with the teacher, rather than through a dress code.

We disagree. Having a clear dress code leaves no doubt how teachers are supposed to be attired. Judging by the banned clothing list above, we cannot image any teacher balking at those common-sense restrictions.

1
Text Only
Editorials
  • Get involved Get involved

    Cumberland residents who want to make an impact on their community have an opportunity in that the city is seeking applicants for five of its boards.

    July 30, 2014 1 Photo

  • If we don’t sell it to them, somebody else will

    The front page article on coal exports by AP writer Dina Cappiello is one of the most asinine and biased “news” articles I’ve read (“Not in my backyard: U.S. sending dirty coal abroad,” July 29 Times-News, Page 1A).

    July 30, 2014

  • Not a villain Not a villain

    Time was that we looked for heroes. Heroes of the make-believe variety have sold a lot of comic books. We also had real-life heroes like Presidents Franklin D. Roosevelt and John F. Kennedy, whose deaths the whole nation mourned.
    These days, we seem to be more interested in looking for villains. “Vote for me because I’m the good guy” has taken a back seat to “Don’t vote for him, because he’s the bad guy.”

    July 29, 2014 1 Photo

  • About time About time

    Although many Cumberland streets are in need of repair and improvements, the decision by city and county officials to address Greene Street is a good one.

    July 28, 2014 1 Photo

  • Where is it?

    Once upon a time, the Maryland Chamber of Commerce held its annual conventions at the Bedford Springs resort hotel near Bedford, which is in Pennsylvania.

    July 28, 2014

  • Korean War Korean War

    July 27, 2014 1 Photo

  • Sloppy lawmaking is to blame

    July 27, 2014

  • C-minus grade C-minus grade

    If a survey conducted by Thumbtack.com and the Kaufman Foundation is an accurate portrayal, Maryland has a long way to go to become a business-friendly state.

    July 24, 2014 1 Photo

  • Big loophole Big loophole

    How ironic — and how sad — that the Potomac Highlands Airport Authority plans a closed executive session to discuss the open meetings law.

    July 23, 2014 1 Photo 1 Story

  • Preposterous Preposterous

    File this one under the We Thought We’d Heard Everything category: A man who attempted the armed robbery of a pizza shop is now suing the pizzeria and the employees who tackled him and wrestled his gun away during the holdup.

    July 22, 2014 1 Photo