Cumberland Times-News

Letters

January 4, 2014

New trees will help the bay

Get Rooted in Cumberland and the Shade Tree Commission would like to thank Cumberland’s North End homeowners and volunteers who planted 50 trees on Oct. 19.

Queen City Creamery, Tri-State Hand & Occupational Therapy, Martin’s Foods and Little Caesar’s pizza donated food and drink for the volunteers.

Trees were purchased with a Community Legacy grant from Maryland Department of Housing and Community Development.

Additional funding for the Get Rooted in Cumberland project is provided by the Chesapeake Bay Trust, an organization that works to protect the land around rivers and streams that lead to the Chesapeake Bay.

So how does Cumberland’s North End impact our local streams and the Chesapeake Bay?

As you might know, Cumberland has a combined sewer system. This means that sewage from homes and water from rainfall are both collected in the same pipes, which direct flow to the wastewater treatment plant before discharging into the Potomac River.

When we get a heavy rain, the pipes are not large enough to carry the excessive amount of water.

The mixed rainwater and sewage then overflows into our local streams. In North End, there are four points of overflow into Will’s Creek.

How can we prevent or lessen these overflows? Decreasing amounts of impervious surfaces like pavement and cutting back on water usage helps, but one of the most effective methods is to plant trees.

Trees can slow down runoff by collecting rainfall on leaves and by absorbing water up from the ground, cleaning it in the process.

A tree that is 12 inches in diameter can intercept nearly 500 gallons of polluted runoff in one year. The 50 new trees in North End are about 1.5 inches in diameter, but combined they will intercept over 500 gallons of runoff in 2014.

In a few years they will double in size and will intercept nearly 3,000 gallons of runoff per year! These benefits will continue to grow for years as long as the trees are kept healthy.

The issue of managing rain water is becoming more and more important for us here in Maryland due to the focus on improving the health of the Chesapeake Bay.

Planting trees in Allegany County demonstrates progress to the Bay Program.

Other Maryland counties are currently requiring their property owners to pay a tax based on the amount of roofed and paved surfaces on their property.  

For now, Allegany County does not have to enforce that tax. Every tree voluntarily planted works to keep us exempt from that tax.

Most importantly for residents of Allegany County, planting trees provides a host of local benefits including increased health of our streams, aesthetics, shade, and overall quality of life. Kudos to North End residents for making a positive difference!

For more information on the benefits of trees in the city of Cumberland, contact natural resource specialist Paul Eriksson at 301-759-6607.

Watch for Get Rooted banners in your neighborhood for future community tree plantings.

Laura Smith, environmental intern; Raquel Ketterman, environmental specialist; Paul Eriksson, natural resource specialist

City of Cumberland

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Letters
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    What exactly is the long-range plan, according to the Allegany County Commissioners?
    I’ve read in the Cumberland Times-News that the current County Commissioners intend to spend $9 million to construct a new high school.

    April 16, 2014

  • H.O.G. Rally coming to Cumberland in June

    Let me introduce myself. My name is Francine Kraft and I am the Maryland/Delaware State H.O.G. Rally Coordinator for 2014.
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    April 16, 2014

  • Access to trout ponds hard for those who have trouble walking

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    April 16, 2014

  • Wait long enough; they will die off without being cared for

    The letter to the editor of April 14 (“Military veterans have few friends in Washington, D.C.”),  I am afraid, hit the nail on the head — sort of — about this next set of returning veterans.

    April 16, 2014

  • Translations differ, but the message is eternal

    This letter is in response to a recent letter titled “One cannot compromise on God’s word” (April 13 Times-News). I had previously written a letter titled “Why are compromises so difficult to achieve” (April 7).

    April 15, 2014

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    After a decade of uncertainty over Clean Water Act jurisdiction following Supreme Court challenges in 2001 and 2006, the Environmental Protection Agency and Army Corps of Engineers announced a forthcoming administrative rule to close enforcement loopholes, restoring protections to 20 million acres of wetlands, more than half the nation’s streams, and drinking water for 117 million Americans.

    April 15, 2014

  • The first step Remember where your freedom comes from before criticizing

    The deal at Fort Hood could have been avoided if it was caught in time.
    When you think a GI is not acting right, have him or her checked out before you put them back on duty and give them a weapon. Post-traumatic stress disorder is a serious and dangerous problem if it is not taken care of right away.

    April 15, 2014 1 Photo

  • Midterm elections give chance to return to American values

    A movement has been started by veterans of our armed forces to get out the vote in 2014. That includes Coast Guard and Merchant Marine personnel for those not familiar with the history of both and their sacrifice. This is no small special interest  group, but many millions of Americans who can have an enormous impact on the  outcome of the November election if they all respond.

    April 14, 2014

  • Military veterans have few friends in Washington, D.C.

    Our legislators in Washington must stop playing politics with our veterans, this is  especially true of Vietnam war veterans. Will the game playing carry over to our veterans of present day wars? Will they too become pawns? Veterans have few friends in Washington. Just like the Vietnam veterans, today’s veterans will face
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    April 13, 2014

  • One cannot compromise on God’s word

    A recent letter asked, “What is it about compromises that seem so undesirable?” Most of us are familiar with John 3:16, which says, “For God so loved the world that he gave his only son, that whoever believes in him should not perish but have eternal life.” The next verse goes on to say, “For God did not send his son into the world to condemn the world, but in order that the world might be saved through him”

    April 13, 2014

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