Cumberland Times-News

Letters

January 13, 2013

Fracking could have worse consequences than you think

At age 22 and a lifetime resident of Allegany County, I fear for the future of our surrounding environment if the state ever approves permits for natural gas drilling.

Our General Assembly recently held in the first of many meetings during which the topic of hydraulic fracturing or “fracking” will often be discussed. We are one of the few states within the Marcellus Shale gas reservoir that do not permit fracking.

The Marcellus Shale stretches from New York through Virginia and contains approximately 10 to 15 years of fossil fuels. To rape the earth and leave behind worthless, lifeless, toxic land for an estimated 10-15 years of natural gas is clearly not sustainable, nor is it sensible.

Western Maryland is known for its scenic and countryside views, so what will we have left once they destroy our environment? Great paragraph!

One of the major consequences of fracking is the environmental impact. The groundwater and air are frequently contaminated and all nutrients are depleted from the earth in each drilling site.

Families ingest the chemicals through cooking, cleaning and bathing with their water causing a multitude of health affects. Even more frightening is the denial of these consequences by the gas and oil companies, let alone their efforts to hide or release these chemicals names.

What evidence we do have is quite alarming. In the documentary “Gas Land,” a sample of flow back water was tested. The results produced a multiple page list of chemicals. This “produced” water collected after the fracking process (much stays in the ground) and dumped in plastic lined pits, injected back into the earth or illegally dumped into ponds, streams and fields.

In addition to the families who have drilling sites in their front and back yards, the workers for these companies are also at great risk.

I recently attended a conference on fracking and its risks, where I spoke to a former employee of a gas company. He shared with me his battle obtaining workers compensation. Once he was instructed to dump a container of drilling waste into a pit. When he jumped into the pit, his boots began melting to his feet. A year later, and this man has yet to learn the chemicals to which he was exposed.

I could go on and on with stories and reports of how fracking has ruined the lives of many.

However, what is most important at this point for Maryland is enacting a statutory moratorium which would prevent fracking from proceeding until studies have been done. A series of 14 tests will be conducted. Only once the risk levels are rated will a lift on the moratorium be considered.

There is a petition circulating to gain support for the moratorium. You can go to the Chesapeake Climate Action Network (chesapeakeclimte.org) website directly or visit the shop Peace of Me in downtown Cumberland on Centre St. or Dante’s Bar on Main St. in Frostburg to sign the petition.

For articles and reports on personal experiences with fracking and more information you can visit NO Fracking in Western Maryland or Fracking Moratorium Now on Facebook. Please learn the facts before you sign over your land. Not only could it affect me and my future but, potentially your life.

Carrie Whetzel

Cumberland

 

1
Text Only
Letters
  • President and Obamacare: Who needs Congress?

    Being a fellow from a small town like Cumberland I don’t always really understand what’s going on in Washington. But I have watched a few houses being built over the years. I even helped some with one house, but my brother fired me from that work pretty quickly, mainly because it was his house being built.

    April 22, 2014

  • Sweet Success Business Forum this evening in Frostburg

    As a member of the Frostburg Business and Professional Association (FBPA), I am pleased to inform the community of the “Sweet Success” event sponsored by the city of Frostburg and our organization.

    April 22, 2014

  • You can help United Way reach its goal

    The United Way of Allegany County campaign for 2013-14 will end April 30 and to date has raised more than $430,000, which is over 86 percent of its goal. But there is still $70,000 to be raised in a very short time.

    April 21, 2014

  • Support the March for Babies May 3 at Canal Place

    At the March of Dimes, we promise to work tirelessly toward the day when all babies are born healthy.
    The March of Dimes has worked for more than 75 years to help babies get a healthy start in life.

    April 20, 2014

  • Celebrate Earth Day every day: Reduce, reuse and recycle

    April 1 marked the beginning of April Envi- ronmental Education Month in Maryland — and with Earth Day coming up on April 22, Maryland has much to celebrate.

    April 20, 2014

  • Support Canal classrooms with tax-deductible gift

    While your April 17 article (“Park Service opens Canal classrooms,” Page 1A) described this exciting program accurately, your readers may be wondering how they can help support this new educational opportunity for school children in Allegany County.

    April 18, 2014

  • Ivan Hall story brings back memories of a unique man

    I enjoyed Mike Sawyers’ Ivan Hall story. It was well written and brought back some wonderful memories of my Cumberland days and especially, an unique man.

    April 18, 2014

  • It’s a secret It’s a secret

    Could someone enlighten us about why not even the names of the two entities bidding on development of the Footer Dye Works building can be divulged?
    A Times-News article about the bids included an explanation from a lawyer for the attorney general’s office about the need to keep the names and other information secret at this time. Despite that, the logic of not divulging at least a little more information escapes us.

    April 17, 2014 1 Photo

  • What do we do about those who weren’t criminals after all?

    Now that Maryland has become the 17th state to (finally) decriminalize possession of marijuana, one could say that the legislature and governor should be patted on the back for doing the right thing.

    April 17, 2014

  • Which approach to the school makes sense?

    What exactly is the long-range plan, according to the Allegany County Commissioners?
    I’ve read in the Cumberland Times-News that the current County Commissioners intend to spend $9 million to construct a new high school.

    April 16, 2014

Latest news
Facebook
Must Read
House Ads