Cumberland Times-News

Local News

December 3, 2011

Capt. James Pyles, Western Troop commander of the Maryland State Police, will hold a training session on “What you should know about the drug addiction, the drug climate and managing drug-related incidents” on Monday at the Short Gap Volunteer Fire Department.

 

SHORT GAP, W.Va. — Capt. James Pyles, Western Troop commander of the Maryland State Police, will hold a training session on “What you should know about the drug addiction, the drug climate and managing drug-related incidents” on Monday at the Short Gap Volunteer Fire Department.
The program relates to heroin, methamphetamines and meth labs, crack cocaine, prescription medications, Fentanyl pain patches and marijuana. Pyles will also speak on warning signs of addictions and how addictions occur. 
“There are a lot of drugs in the area that people aren’t aware of. This training will bring people up to speed,” said Roger Twigg, chief medical officer for Short Gap EMS.
The training session is being held for fire and EMS personnel and the general public. The idea came about because the state requires so many training courses and because the fire department got a new medical director, according to Twigg. 
“I'm astonished at the time, expertise and personal commitment that EMS squads give to maintain their training and performance in the complicated world of emergency medical services,” said Dr. Wayne Spiggle, medical director for Short Gap EMS, in an email to the Times-News. “It requires strong leadership and a large time commitment to do this job right.” 
The training will benefit fire and EMS personnel by making them aware of what to look for when treating a patient and when entering a household as it relates to medical emergencies that may have overtones of an addiction, explained Pyles in an email to the Times-News. They also will learn what signs to look for when managing fires and related incidents as it may relate to making meth.
From an EMS standpoint, the state has a certain protocol handling emergencies where the patient is on illegal drugs, according to Twigg. EMS personnel can tell if a person is on illegal drugs by checking vitals and getting an overall general impression, explained Twigg. 

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