Cumberland Times-News

Local News

October 18, 2012

Fire marshal: Safety first when using space heater

PIKESVILLE — Fall temperatures are in the air and space heaters are arriving on a floor or table near you.

State Fire Marshal William E. Barnard is reminding Marylanders of the risks associated with the use of portable space heaters.

According to the National Fire Protection Association, in 2005-2009, portable and fixed space heaters, including wood stoves, were involved in 32 percent of home heating fires and 79  percent of home heating fire deaths.

In 24 percent of these fires, and 58 percent of the space heater fire deaths, the heater was too close to something that could catch fire.

“The risk of fire from portable space heaters is especially high when used improperly,” according to the fire marshal. “The safety tips listed below will help all Marylanders reduce the chance for injury or death when using portable space heaters.”

• Check labeling on packages containing space heaters to ensure they have been tested by an approved testing laboratory such as before making a purchase.

• Read and follow the manufacturer’s operating instructions and keep the owner’s manual available for reference.

• When using unvented fuel fired heaters, make sure to only use the type of fuel specified in the owner’s manual and never use gasoline.

• Make sure when using unvented fuel fired space heaters that an adequate supply of fresh air is provided. These types of heaters produce carbon monoxide, which is an odorless, colorless and very poisonous gas. The use of carbon monoxide alarms is highly recommended.

• Keep all portable space heaters at least three feet away from combustible items.

• Ensure children and pets are not able to make contact with a space heater.

• Never use an extension cord to operate an electrical space heater. Electrical current used for space heaters can cause extension cords to overheat and potentially cause a fire. Plug the space heater directly into a properly grounded outlet.

• Smoke alarms save lives, prevent injuries and help minimize property damage by detecting and alerting residents to fires early in their development. The risk of dying from fires in homes without smoke alarms is twice as high as in homes that have working smoke alarms.

1
Text Only
Local News
  • Overturned tanker upsets Oakland Overturned tanker upsets Oakland

    OAKLAND — Two large commercial wreckers were being used at mid-afternoon Wednesday to upright a tanker full of liquid propane that overturned several hours earlier in downtown Oakland and forced evacuation of the business district.

    April 16, 2014 1 Photo

  • Park Service opens Canal Classrooms Park Service opens Canal Classrooms

    CUMBERLAND – The National Park Service held a ribbon-cutting event Wednesday for a new program called Canal Classrooms, which will offer students pre-K through fifth grade accredited classwork on the Canal Place grounds.

    April 16, 2014 1 Photo

  • CODY EVERSOLE Eversole named 2014 Kelley Award winner

    KEYSER, W.Va. — Keyser High School senior Cody Eversole was named this year’s J. Edward Kelley Award winner during a ceremony Wednesday morning at Potomac State College.
    The award is presented to an outstanding male student-athlete in each year’s senior class.

    April 16, 2014 1 Photo

  • South Cumberland home rebuilt after fire South Cumberland home rebuilt after fire

    CUMBERLAND — A South Cumberland home destroyed by fire last July was given a second chance recently after the owner decided he wanted to remain a part of the neighborhood and had his house rebuilt.

    April 16, 2014 1 Photo

  • School vaccination requirements change

    April 17, 2014

  • Mineral BOE gives $18K to library

    KEYSER, W.Va. — The Mineral County Board of Education voted unanimously Tuesday to give the Keyser-Mineral County Public Library $18,000 for fiscal 2015 and to give the Piedmont library an additional $1,000 out of carryover funds.

    April 16, 2014

  • The Eichhorn family Local family says hosting New York City children in summer is ‘wonderful experience’

    CUMBERLAND — Sonya and Christopher Morgan of Cumberland always planned on a hosting a child through The Fresh Air Fund Volunteer Host Family Program. “Christopher always said once we had kids of our own we were going to do it. When our son turned 6 we said, ‘OK, let’s do it,’” said Sonya.

    April 16, 2014 2 Photos

  • City, county officials to talk baseball at work session

    CUMBERLAND — During today’s Allegany County Commission work session, a proposal to study the possibility of bringing a professional-level baseball team to the area will be vetted again, this time with participants from the city of Cumberland.

    April 16, 2014

  • Report: High-quality child care lacking in West Virginia

    CHARLESTON, W.Va. (AP) — Child care programs of minimum or unrated quality are watching over about 93 percent of West Virginia children enrolled in them, a report released Wednesday said.

    April 16, 2014

  • JIM HINEBAUGH Hinebaugh seeks Garrett County commissioner post

    Jim Hinebaugh recently announced his candidacy for Garrett County commissioner. A Garrett County native and lifelong Republican, Hinebaugh graduated from Southern High School and attended Frostburg State University before entering the U.S. Army via the draft. After serving as an enlisted member, Hinebaugh completed Officer Candidate School and was commissioned as a second lieutenant. He retired as a colonel/06 in 1995 with almost 29 years of service including eight years overseas.

    April 16, 2014 1 Photo

Facebook
Must Read
News related video