Cumberland Times-News

Local News

November 24, 2012

Veteran turned advocate seeks claims change

Ex-Marine who lost sight in Vietnam has helped thousands

PARKERSBURG, W.Va. — David Huffman has helped thousands of military veterans seeking disability benefits navigate the complex, often slow and at times frustrating claims process. The Wood County lawyer can relate: he was a 19-year-old Marine in Vietnam when a booby trap blinded him.

As if getting through college and law school without sight weren’t challenges enough, Huffman has begun a new quest: convincing the U.S. government to change the way it allows lawyers to handle veteran disability claims.

Huffman is targeting the policy for claims, revised in 2007, that says a veteran can hire a lawyer for a fee only after a claim has been rejected. He supports what he hopes becomes a national movement, Veterans for Full Representation, which is seeking nonprofit status from the U.S. Internal Revenue Service and recently launched a website. Ultimately, he hopes officials will allow fee-charging lawyers earlier in the process.

“I want the (Disabled American Veterans), the VFW or any of them to say, ‘Why the heck would you want to pay an attorney 20 percent of your back check, when we can do it for free?’ Maybe that will help them do better, to give the veteran a choice,” Huffman said. “Veterans, in the long run, are better off having free choice and full representation from either an attorney or a claims representative.”

Huffman has long been involved in veterans’ affairs. He caught the attention of President Ronald Reagan in the early 1980s, after earning his degrees with the help of audio books, and agreed to join the new Vietnam Veterans Leadership Program. A Delaware native, Huffman was also active in such groups as Vietnam Veterans of America.

He moved to West Virginia after meeting his wife, Cheryl, in 2000 and began aiding veterans on a case-by-case, word-of-mouth basis.

Huffman now has nearly 2,000 veteran clients and estimates that he’s helped several times as many in the last dozen years.

Groups like the Disabled American Veterans provide service officers to help veterans file benefit claims for free. While praising these organizations, Huffman questions whether they have enough staff for the avalanche of claims both from recently returned and aging veterans.

The U.S. Census Bureau estimates there are more than 22 million veterans nationally. Of the 1.6 million from the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan, 45 percent are now seeking compensation for injuries they say are service-related, The Associated Press recently found. That compares with 21 percent who filed such claims after the Gulf War in the early 1990s, top government officials told the AP.

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