Cumberland Times-News

Opinion

January 16, 2013

The government doesn’t want to take your guns

Lately, there has been a great deal of debate over the issue of firearm control in the United States.

However, despite what the N.R.A., Fox News, and their disciples would have you believe, the government does not want to take your guns away.

The government desires to accomplish two things. Firstly, a more rigid regulation on the purchasing of firearms such as more strict permit and background check laws.

To me, this comes across as nothing more than common sense; after all the U.S. government requires licenses and permits for driving, hunting, fishing, and construction to name a few.

These are, for the most part, in place to promote safety and responsibility. How could any rational person argue against promoting safe and responsible firearm use?

Additionally, firearm users should be held accountable for their weapons at all time and ensure that when not in use they are safely and securely stored.

One suggestion could be implementing a firearms insurance program. After all, insurance is in place to protect automobile users in the event of theft or accident. A similar system, if enacted for firearm owners, would hopefully further promote safe and responsible gun ownership.

The second issue with which the government is concerned regarding firearms is the plan to ban military grade assault weapons, much like those used in the Sandy Hook, Aurora. Virginia Tech, and Columbine shootings.

While I understand the practical uses of some firearms for home protection and sport/hunting, what practical purposes do military style assault weapons serve other than efficient mass killing.

Additionally, banning assault weapons from civilian use is no different from not permitting civilian access to other military style weaponry such as rocket launchers, missiles, and weapons grade nuclear fuels.

I for one believe that granting civilians access to such weapons would be an absurdly bad idea.

Even conservative demigod Ronald Reagan agreed with these sentiments, stating at his 78th birthday party celebration on Feb. 6, 1989 that “I do not believe in taking away the right of the citizen for sporting, for hunting and so forth, or for home defense. But I do believe that an AK-47, a machine gun, is not a sporting weapon or needed for defense of a home.”

Furthermore, I would like to argue against the reasoning that gun laws and regulations would be ineffective because criminals will not obey such laws.

Well, since when have criminals ever obeyed laws? Based on this flawed logic, we should have no laws whatsoever.

Lastly, other developed nations such as the United Kingdom, Canada, and Australia have implemented regulatory practices similar, if not identical, to the proposed regulations in America.

A simple glance at the firearm based violent crime statistics in these countries, the highest of which is 10 times lower than that of the United States; suggest that these regulations have been extremely successful.

It is my hope that the American population will come to its senses and realize that such laws are necessary to help curtail the mass killings and violent incidents that have taken the lives of so many innocent Americans.

Alexander M. Brant

LaVale

1
Text Only
Opinion
  • The first step The first step

    If all goes as planned, Frostburg State University will one day offer a doctorate in nursing, a physician’s assistant program and a new health sciences building on campus.

    April 15, 2014 1 Photo

  • Translations differ, but the message is eternal

    This letter is in response to a recent letter titled “One cannot compromise on God’s word” (April 13 Times-News). I had previously written a letter titled “Why are compromises so difficult to achieve” (April 7).

    April 15, 2014

  • Closing the loopholes will help clear the regulatory waters

    After a decade of uncertainty over Clean Water Act jurisdiction following Supreme Court challenges in 2001 and 2006, the Environmental Protection Agency and Army Corps of Engineers announced a forthcoming administrative rule to close enforcement loopholes, restoring protections to 20 million acres of wetlands, more than half the nation’s streams, and drinking water for 117 million Americans.

    April 15, 2014

  • The first step Remember where your freedom comes from before criticizing

    The deal at Fort Hood could have been avoided if it was caught in time.
    When you think a GI is not acting right, have him or her checked out before you put them back on duty and give them a weapon. Post-traumatic stress disorder is a serious and dangerous problem if it is not taken care of right away.

    April 15, 2014 1 Photo

  • Where to look Where to look

    Drive anywhere in Maryland and it seems there is one highway construction project after another. While it is good to see our roads and bridges being upgraded, it can be nerve-wracking for anyone traveling a long distance.

    April 14, 2014 1 Photo

  • Midterm elections give chance to return to American values

    A movement has been started by veterans of our armed forces to get out the vote in 2014. That includes Coast Guard and Merchant Marine personnel for those not familiar with the history of both and their sacrifice. This is no small special interest  group, but many millions of Americans who can have an enormous impact on the  outcome of the November election if they all respond.

    April 14, 2014

  • Speed cameras Speed cameras

    We’ve never been big fans of speed cameras, primarily for two reasons. First, because the cameras are not always accurate, and secondly because many jurisdictions seem to create revenue by installing cameras and issuing high numbers of speeding tickets.

    April 10, 2014 1 Photo

  • Group wants status quo on Sunday hunting

    Many Maryland residents have grown very concerned about two legislative bills that are arriving on the desk of Gov. Martin O’Malley after being approved by both the Senate and House chambers this session. With the governor’s possible signature of these bills into law, hunting would be allowed on certain state lands on Sundays — a day in the past reserved for rest and non-hunters to enjoy public lands.

    April 10, 2014

  • New policies will grow better streamside buffers

    Well-functioning forest buffers along streams are perhaps the most effective and least costly best management practice we have to restore the Chesapeake Bay.

    April 10, 2014

  • National Day of Prayer events begin April 30

    The Cumberland National Day of Prayer Committee has finalized plans for the 63rd annual observance, with a prayer rally, a breakfast, an outdoor worship ceremony and youth rally planned April 30 through May 2.

    April 9, 2014