Cumberland Times-News

Opinion

April 6, 2013

They should be at odds

I insert the key activating electrical circuits and my car engine starts. If it doesn’t, my mechanic will process various tests and deliver the solution. The same can be said for repair of washing machines, lawnmowers, PCs, and toothaches.

Toothaches! Oh, those dreaded dentist visits! My dentist will follow a set procedure to analyze, diagnose, repair and relieve the pain.

So what is Georgia Rep. Paul Brown’s issue when at Hartwell’s Liberty Baptist Church he proclaimed, “I was taught about evolution, embryology and Big Bang Theory, all that is lies straight from the pit of hell.”? He also believes the earth is 9,000 years old and created in six days.

All too regularly, the Bible as historical fact becomes a cause of contention. In a nation where $27 million is spent to build a Creation Museum, a recent Gallop poll reported that 46 percent of Americans believe God created humans in their present state 10,000 year ago.

To further the issue, many states pass laws legitimizing creationism and Bible stories into the science classroom and curriculum.

Science and religion are at odds, and should be! The scientific method of investigation is the critical core of all science curricula. The goal of any science lab is to formulate, test, measure, and produce predictable outcomes.

To include religious dogma in the science classroom is to assume religion is something it is not — a product of the scientific process.

Without question, we all comfortably rely upon the scientific method, as we benefit from kidney dialysis, computer and media applications, non-invasive surgeries, penicillin, our car’s ignition system, and much more.

We even accept evolution principles when we get our flu shot. Why doesn’t last years flu vaccine relieve this year’s infection?

Dr, Mark Siegel, pandemic researcher, noted, “It could take six months to develop a vaccine for the new swine flu, and by then, nobody knows what it will have evolved to.” There, he said it: “evolve”! Yes, even in the 21st century, evolution is alive and functioning.

Science endorses an earth well over 70 million years old and still in an evolutionary process.

Some Christians challenge such statements, as Scripture interpretation poses other opinions. Challenge — there is no challenge! What this is a failure to comprehend a distinct system of understanding.

Unlike science, religion is about morality, professes salvation through dogma, and ministers to life’s rites and passages. It is a faith based belief system defined by scripture, interpretation, and doctrine.

Currently there are 156 (even more with sub-sects) Christian sects; meaning there are 156-plus different Christian scripture/doctrine interpretations. (World Christian Encyclopedia, 2010)

A system of understanding based on faith with 156 basic doctrine variables isn’t a science, nor can the possibility of 156 faith-based solutions be acceptable in any science curriculum.

Legislators who endorse religion in the science classroom are champions of nonsense with no desire to promote actual critical thinking. They exhibit only the ability to garner votes by condoning a system that will curb our children from learning and blind them to the real world.

I remain content. With the reliability of the scientific method, I can confidently state: the earth is much older than 9,000 years, species are evolving, the universe expands as it adds time to its 13.23 billion years, and my tooth no longer aches.

Robert Llewellyn

Cumberland

 

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