Cumberland Times-News

Opinion

April 7, 2013

We don’t dare disagree with those in power

I think your editorial, “Muzzled: Citizen’s right to speak violated by commissioners” (March 20 Times-News), was spot on.

It never ceases to amaze me at how our elected officials promise to listen to “the people” while campaigning for their positions, but once elected, they become arrogant and rude when it comes to allowing us to utilize our First Amendment rights.

This entire state has become a clear example of tyrannical, oppressive, and socialistic-based reasoning. Starting with Gov. Martin O’Malley down to county and local elected officials, there appears to an imposed “gag order” on anyone who disagrees with the opinion of those in power.

I stood in line in Annapolis for more than 10 hours to provide verbal testimony regarding my opposition to the proposed gun control bills.

I signed up early that morning, but was never afforded the right to give my testimony. Why? Over 500 people signed up to speak against any changes in the gun laws in Maryland.

About 75 people had signed up in favor of stricter and, in my opinion, laws that are totally misaligned with the Second Amendment of the Constitution.  Guess what? Those in favor were heard, while only about 30 percent of those opposed were given an opportunity to present their case.

Whatever happened to majority rules? Well, in Maryland it has a special meaning. This state is overwhelmingly lopsided, as Baltimore City/County registers a great number of people receiving “public assistance” and they tend to vote for any agenda of the Democratic Party.

I myself am a registered Democrat, but I have not, nor will I ever vote solely based on party lines. As a matter of fact, I am considering registering as an Independent, as neither party appears to speak for my morals and values.

My paternal grandfather was encouraged to run for elected office in Cambria County, Pa. He refused. He said that he had never been “bought off” by any human being and he planned to stay that way. He chose to follow his Christian beliefs instead of seeking approval from men.

I thank God every day that my father followed my grandfather’s example. I would rather follow the rule of God than the rule of fallible human beings. In the end, I will reside in eternity with the only just and perfect government, ruled by Christ, who is the King of Kings and Lord of Lords.

I feel truly sorry for those who have proclaimed themselves to be God. I assure you, their eternal home will not a pleasant place.

On a final note, I would like to send a personal message to our governor: Thanks for abolishing the death penalty while creating a huge vulnerability for law-abiding citizens. Thanks for giving a “green light” to those same types of criminals by reducing our ability to defend ourselves.

You just sent a clear message to murderers, rapists, drug dealers, and burglars that, not only can they take a life without fear of having theirs taken, but you invite them to break into our homes because we won’t have much of a chance to protect ourselves.

I’m going to assume that by your extension of life sentences, my taxes will also be raised to accommodate these criminals’ room and board, medical care, and “rehabilitation.”

However, I am in the process of making a move to Pennsylvania, where you are still allowed your freedoms under the Constitution. I might apply for a “permit to carry,” in case any of your “lifers” escapes to Pennsylvania.

Renae Bloss

Cumberland

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