Cumberland Times-News

Opinion

April 20, 2013

Judge less and reach out

This letter is in response to an article written by Beauyn Kodani of Fulton. I am going to assume that this person is a he but I am not 100 percent that is the case as I am not familiar with the name. So, please excuse me if I am incorrect.

There has been a lot of controversy concerning the gasoline tax increase in Maryland. Since I can easily get my gas in my state of West Virginia I did not concern myself with the subject, however, after reading Mr. Kodani’s article on April 14 I began to personalize the increase. Here is why:

Unlike a lot of well-to-do folks, Mr. Kodani admits that this increase in gas taxes will not affect him at all. He even admits that he probably would not have even noticed other than he knew about it from all of the publicity. He even admits to counting his blessings because it would not affect his life at all.

Another thing Mr. Kodani expressed was his concern for the folks who make so little that they will definetely notice this increase at the pump. With great compassion and intregity he also stated he feels this is not fair. I applaud him and his genuine concern for the people who are working and can barely support their families. He is indeed a person of good character.

If more well-to-do folks would adopt his stance on poverty I believe our country would not be so divided. If those with wealth would humble themselves and count their blessings instead of judging others less fortunate I believe we can begin fix our country.

Not everyone is intelligent. Not everyone has the physical or mental strength to build an empire. Not everyone has the confidence it takes to follow their dreams. And face it, who would work for minimum wage to allow others to pursue their dreams if all of us were on the road to wealth?

Just as there are folks out there that abuse the welfare and disability programs, there are also the wealthy who conveniently find all sorts of loopholes to avoid taxes that could also help our deficit. So, if we are to judge, which one of these crimes is the worst?

 Just one example of the unfairness between the rich and the poor in this country is how drug abusers are treated. The wealthy can buy themselves out of trouble. They can afford the best rehab places to go to in place of jail. When they get out of rehab they are still rich and admired. However, the kid that had a horrible life growing up and gets into trouble is nothing more than than a worthless bum in some eyes. The truth is a rich drug addict is still commiting a crime in the eyes of the law. The only difference is who can afford to make bail and obtain a high class attorney to get them off.

Don’t get me wrong, I am not putting every well-to-do person in the same category. I know there are really good wealthy folks out there who do a lot to help others. By the same token, not everyone on assistance or only making a poverty level income is lazy and no good.

Another reason we are so divided in our country is that we listen to the news and then sterotype instead of individualize. It is time to do less judging and instead do more reaching out.

Carolyn Weigle

Short Gap, W.Va.

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