Cumberland Times-News

December 5, 2012

No. 15 Georgetown beats Texas 64-41


Cumberland Times-News

— NEW YORK — John Thompson III wasn’t happy with Georgetown’s offense. Still, it wasn’t as bad as the last game.

The 15th-ranked Hoyas played some solid defense and beat Texas 64-41 in the opener of the Jimmy V Classic on Tuesday night at Madison Square Garden.

“I don’t think our offense was good tonight. Too stagnant,” Thompson said just three days after the Hoyas beat Tennessee 37-36. He refused to think one game had anything to do with the other.

“We haven’t had trouble scoring points,” Thompson said of his team that entered Tuesday’s game averaging 64.7 points per game. “That game was an anomaly. That’s not who we are. The ball just didn’t go in the basket. I don’t think anybody can say we can’t score. That’s not who we are.”

Otto Porter had 14 points and eight rebounds to lead Georgetown. Nate Lubick added 13 points and Markel Starks had 11 for the Hoyas, who led by 13 at halftime. The lead grew to 23 and was never less than eight in the second half.

“I thought we were quite attentive to defense,” Thompson said. “With the exception of giving them some free throws and some baskets in transition, they had to work for everything they got and that’s what we wanted to do.”

The Hoyas (6-1), whose only loss this season was to No. 1 Indiana in overtime, scored the first nine points of the game, the last four from Lubick on layups.

Sheldon McClellan had 12 points to lead the Longhorns (5-3), who had their lowest point total under coach Rick Barnes, who took over for the 1998-99 season. Texas had won three straight after losing two in a row.

The Longhorns struggled with their shooting and turnovers throughout the first half. The Hoyas led by as many as 17 points in the first half, the last time at 30-13 on a jumper by Porter with 2:55 to go.

“We defended them well enough. We really did,” Texas coach Rick Barnes said. “It was our offense again. We don’t put pressure on people the way we should.”

Texas shot 28.6 percent (8 of 28), including 1 of 6 from 3-point range, in the first half against Georgetown and committed 12 turnovers that the Hoyas turned into 14 points on the way to a 30-17 halftime lead.

The shooting was almost as bad in the second half. Texas, which came in averaging 64.4 points per game, finished 6 of 20 (30 percent) from the field in the second half and was 14 of 48 (29.2 percent) overall. The Longhorns were 2 of 13 from 3-point range.

“What I’m disappointed most in is just the will to continue to fight wasn’t there,” Barnes said. “We start the game and all we talk about is not turning the ball over. They don’t do what we practice. They didn’t do one thing we didn’t expect.”

Georgetown shot 41 percent (25 of 61) for the game but the Hoyas made only 4 of 18 from beyond the arc.

Porter hit some big shots early.

“The team trusts me to be aggressive and that’s what I wanted to pick up coming into this season,” he said.

The win over Tennessee was the Hoyas’ worst offensive effort of the shot clock era, their lowest point total since a 37-36 win over Southern Methodist in the second round of the NCAA tournament in 1985. Georgetown shot 36 percent in the game and Tennessee made 33 percent.

Texas again played without 6-foot-1 guard Myck Kabongo because of an ongoing NCAA eligibility investigation.

“That doesn’t matter right now,” Barnes said. “Right now it’s not about that. We’re better than we’re playing.”

It was just the second meeting between the programs. Texas beat Georgetown 78-70 on Jan.8, 1972, in Austin.



Arkansas 81, Oklahoma 78

FAYETTEVILLE, Ark. — Marshawn Powell still won’t say he’s 100 percent healthy after last year’s knee surgery that kept him out for most of the season.

The Arkansas junior — who says he’s 95 percent — looked every bit his old self on Tuesday night, scoring a career-high 33 points to help the Razorbacks avoid a three-game losing streak with an 81-78 win over Oklahoma.

Powell added six rebounds and five assists for Arkansas (4-3), which avoided its first four-game losing streak since closing out the 2009-10 season with six straight losses. The forward bested his previous career high of 29 points, which was set against Appalachian State in 2009.

“I felt so comfortable today,” Powell said. “I decided before we started playing just to leave everything that was basically in the last couple of games in the locker room and just play, play my game, play how I play.”

The Sooners (6-2) rallied from an 11-point second-half deficit to take a 78-77 lead in the closing minute.

However, Arkansas’ BJ Young answered with a floater in the lane to put the Razorbacks back up 79-77 — a lead they held on to for good.

Romero Osby led the Sooners with 22 points, while Amath M’Baye finished with 14 and Steven Pledger 12. Oklahoma was 31 of 56 (55 percent) from the field, including 64 percent in the second half, but it struggled to stop Arkansas, which was 30 of 57 (52.6 percent) from the field.

“We had good movement, attacked and made plays for each other, had rhythm jumpers,” Oklahoma coach Lon Kruger said. “I though the offensive side of it wasn’t our problem there in the second half. We gave up 50-plus percent shooting as well.”

Arkansas, which led all except in the early going, led by as many as 11 points early in the second half — taking a 53-42 lead after a basket on the break by Hunter Mickelson.

Oklahoma rallied and took a 78-77 lead in the closing minute after a second straight 3-pointer by Pledger with 22 seconds remaining.

Young, however, quickly drove into the lane on the other end for the Razorbacks and hit his running floater to put them back up 79-78 with 15 seconds remaining.

“It was just time for a big-time player to make a big-time play,” Young said.

Osby then missed a long jumper with 4 seconds remaining, and Powell grabbed the rebound for Arkansas. He was fouled and then hit two free throws with 2.4 seconds left, and he followed that up with a deflection to keep the Sooners from getting an open look as time expired.

“I thought it was going in when it left my hand,” Osby said. “Unfortunately, it didn’t.”

Powell missed all but two games last season with a torn ACL in his right knee, one year after earning second-team All-Southeastern Conference honors. He entered the game averaging 13.3 points per game this season, including a 19-point effort in a loss last week to Syracuse.

The 6-foot-7 forward had that many points by halftime against Oklahoma, helping Arkansas extend its lead to as many as nine points in the first half. His layup put the Razorbacks up 31-22, and he was 7 of 9 from the field in the half, including a perfect 3 of 3 on 3-pointers.

He finished a career-best 4 of 6 from behind the arc, topping his previous best of two 3-pointers in a game.

“It was good to see him really look in rhythm, but not only on just offense, but I thought defensively,” Arkansas coach Mike Anderson said. “I thought his presence was very, very important for our basketball team out there. It was very evident tonight.”

Young also finished in double figures with 10 points, as did Mardracus Wade for Arkansas, which was 9 of 22 on 3-pointers. Young also had eight assists.

The Razorbacks led 69-61 after an inside basket by Ky Madden, but Oklahoma closed to within 69-68 thanks to a 7-0 run that was capped by a jumper by M’Baye.

Arkansas used a pair of last-second shots to hold off the Sooners down the stretch. The Razorbacks were called for a shot-clock violation while up 73-68, and Oklahoma closed to within 73-70 after an inside basket by Osby.

With the shot clock once again winding down, Madden found Powell for a jumper on the baseline that put Arkansas back up 75-70.