Garrett Regional Medical Center earns sixth award for short-term rehab care

Garrett Regional Medical Center’s Subacute Unit staff celebrates winning its sixth Best Nursing Home award from US News & World Report, receiving a 5 out of 5 performance rating for short-term rehabilitation care. From the left are Melissa Marple, Amanda Bow, Sherry Lewis, Melany Platter, Lori Davis and Keisha Glotfelty. 

OAKLAND — Garrett Regional Medical Center’s Subacute Unit won its sixth Best Nursing Home award from US News & World Report, receiving a 5 out of 5 performance rating for short-term rehabilitation care.

Of the 226 nursing home facilities in the state, GRMC is one of only 67 to achieve a top performance rating. This year’s ratings incorporated several measures of quality, including consistency of registered nurse staffing, use of antipsychotic drugs and success in preventing falls.

“We are honored that the excellent care provided by our Subacute Unit has once again been recognized with this distinguished award,” said Kendra Thayer, senior vice president of patient services. “This recognition is due to our incredible staff, who strive every day to treat our patients like family. They are a dedicated and compassionate team who always go above and beyond to help our patients through their recovery. Their commitment and hard work make this team very deserving of the recognition they have received over the years.”

The award is based on data provided by Nursing Home Compare, a program run by the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services. CMS develops and enforces quality and safety standards across the nation’s health care system. Data used by US News to determine nursing home performance is measured over the course of a year, with facilities required to meet certain performance standards consistently throughout the 12-month period.

Garrett Regional Medical Center’s Subacute Care Department is a 10-bed unit designed for patients who may fall between nursing home care and hospital care and serves between 350 to 400 patients annually. Subacute patients require complex care or rehabilitation. Some patients might be recovering from a stroke, surgery, cardio-respiratory conditions or wounds. The unit offers its own dining area, activity room and laundry facility to provide patients with the care and education needed to function when they return home.

“Patient stays in our department can vary from a few days to several weeks,” said Lori Davis, registered nurse and director of the Subacute Unit. “The extended time we spend with our patients allows us to form a special bond. This department truly feels like a family.” 

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